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November 17th, 2018

Spending on design fast tracks company growth

Global business consultants McKinsey recently conducted what they believed to be (at the time of writing) ‘the most extensive and rigorous research undertaken anywhere to study the design actions that leaders can make to unlock business value.’ Its core findings are that investment in good design, regardless of your business sector, increases company performance significantly. These are their key findings:

The McKinsey Design Index highlights four key areas of action companies should take to join the top quartile of design performers where the greatest impact is achieved. These are:

  1. From the top of the organization, adopt an analytical approach to design by measuring and leading your company’s performance in design quality with the same rigor the company devotes to revenues and costs.
  2. Put the user experience front and centre in the company’s culture.
  3. Nurture your top design people (including external consultants) and empower them in cross-functional teams that take collective accountability for improving the user experience.
  4. Iterate, test, and learn rapidly, incorporating user insights from the first idea until long after the final product is launched.

Companies that tackle these four priorities boost their odds of becoming more creative organizations that consistently design great products and services. For companies that fully implement these four principles, ‘the prizes are as rich as doubling their revenue growth and shareholder returns’ over those of their industry counterparts. That would suggest budgeting for comprehensive investment in design is worth every penny.

Companies in the property development industry should consider increasing their expenditure on design by 50%. If one assumes design is roughly 3% of the gross development value of the final product, increasing expenditure on design to 4.5% of GDV could take typical 20% returns to in-excess of 30%. Perhaps someone is courageous enough to give it ago. Give us a ring and we can put this theory to the test.

You can see the full article here:

https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/mckinsey-design/our-insights/the-business-value-of-design

 

November 12th, 2018

Winners of the Architecture Masterprize 2018

Our Milford-on-Sea Beach Huts project has continued its run of award success with a win at The Architecture MasterPrize (AMP).

This international architecture award aims to become one of the most respected architectural awards and set a new benchmark for the architectural and design professions globally.

The AMP celebrates the very best in design excellence and innovation from the worlds of Architectural, Interior, and Landscape Design. Their website states; The Architecture MasterPrize stands:

  • To advance the appreciation of quality architectural design around the world,
  • To celebrate the greatest achievements in architecture, interior design and landscape design,
  • To showcase the world-class talent and visionaries in these fields.

The MasterPrize honours and awards the talents of those who push boundaries and set new standards, who turn the ordinary into the truly extraordinary and inspire others, today and for generations to come. We are delighted to have been selected alongside some amazing projects around the globe. The details of the award can be viewed at:

https://architectureprize.com/winners/winner.php?id=3380&count=4&mode=

and the other winning projects can be found at:

https://architectureprize.com/winners/2018.php?utm_source=sendy&utm_campaign=winners&utm_medium=email

October 13th, 2018

Shortlisted for the AJ Architecture Awards

It has been a good week for Milford-On-Sea Beach huts. Having won the BCI Awards the project has now also been shortlisted for the Architects Journal Architecture Awards. The shortlisted schemes can be see at https://awards.architectsjournal.co.uk/2018shortlist

October 12th, 2018

Winners of the British Construction Industry Awards 2018

BCI Awards 2018

We are delighted that our Milford-on-sea Beach Huts won the Climate Resilience Project of the Year at the BCI Awards. This is the industries leading award and we feel very privileged to have been part of the winning team. Our thanks go to New Forest District Council who, as client, gave us the opportunity to properly develop the projects full potential. We are also grateful to our collaborators Ramboll and contractors, Knights Brown. It is great to think that this nationally significant project was delivered entirely by a local New Forest team.

With the IPCC recently increasing the urgency of their warnings it is essential that our industry continues to develop innovative solutions to climate resilience. Our hope is that Milford-On-Sea Beach Huts will encourage others commissioning sea defence projects to be similarly innovative.

October 2nd, 2018

RIBA Smart Practice Conference 2018

We are looking forward to the @RIBA #Smartpractice2018 Conference on 4th October. Paul Bulkeley, Snug’s founding director, will be speaking on Adding Value Where it Matters to the Clients Business Model. 

October 2nd, 2018

Bailey Close coming together

Great to see our development of five affordable flats for Winchester City Council’s New Homes Team are coming together. The development sits snuggly into a steeply retained site in a former garage court. These largely single aspect units have an angled facade that frame views, and adds dynamism to the facade. Not long to go now.

August 23rd, 2018

Love where you work

We came in this morning to discover Robin celebrating his first anniversary…..of working at Snug! #lovewhereyouwork

August 16th, 2018

Designing for Multigenerational Living

The number of multigenerational households in the UK is growing rapidly. Between 2009 and 2014 there was a 38% growth in this sector. Data prepared by @NHBC suggests that 6.8% of UK households are multigenerational, which is roughly equivalent to 1.8 million households.

Not everyone either wants or is able to move house when their family circumstances change. This can require an existing family home to be converted into a multigenerational one. Few standard house types are suited to easy conversion and even fewer have been designed with this in mind. The key is built in flexibility. That may mean a suitable spatial configuration, adequate structural redundancy and service connections for a future extension over the garage, rooms in the roof or a rear/side extension. Alternatively it can mean internal reorganisation to allow a larger space to be subdivided or a master bedroom and ensuite to be converted into a self contained annex. There are a multitude of approaches that can be taken as long as the intention is established early enough in the design process.

Illustrated below are two competition winning schemes that we have developed around multigenerational living. The first is the SAM House, based around the ‘Seven Ages of Man.’ It combines all of the strategies outlined above whilst also delivering semi-detached living in what appears to be a detached house.


The second was a proposal for a series of adaptations and extensions to a traditional home that enabled enhanced multigenerational living.

The ideas behind the house are captured in a hypothetical interview with the homeowner in 2050: 

What are some of your favourite memories?

What memories I have. We bought the house in 2006. House prices were over inflated in those days and we could only afford the house because of the partially completed fitout. We also rented the top floor until we gave each of the boys their own room in the roof. They loved being up there with a floor to themselves.

We have always loved the flexibility of the cavenous master suite. It was great to be able to retreat into our own space. I particularly loved sitting out on the roof terrace,discretely watching the boys playing in the garden below.

We regularly had friends to stay and put the guest room through its paces. We had been unsure the double entry bathroomwould work but found our visitors, and for many years my mother, loved it.

We had some great diner parties in those days. We loved showing off the telescopic dining room. When all the kids had gone off to university we realised just how important it was to be able to shrink and not just enlarge the dining room. Rattling around that space would have probably made us feel like it was time to move. So glad we didn’t.

What else did you like about the house?

I loved being in the kitchen when the kids were younger. They would lounge in thesnugplaying with their toys. As they got older we built a workstation and they would do their home work there. Eventually, when I set up my business, I used it as my office. It really was the heart of the house. I still love the way you can flow through the permeable ground floor. So much nicer then those old open plan layouts!

In 2015 food prices went through the roof. That was when we really prioritised cultivating the front garden allotment. What a great use of what was otherwise a waste of space.

In 2018 temperatures really soared and the way air was drawn through the house made such a difference. These days I realise that it’s the way the house works, rather then how it looks, that really matters… Those integrated systems must have saved us a small fortune over the years.

What about the future?

Well it looks like I’m going to be here indefinitely. I am moving up into the flat in the roof by myself now.  There is a lifted being fitted to make things easier for me. My eldest son is so looking forward to moving back in, this time with his own family! It really has been a house for life.

This is the critical issue. We must design houses for Life…..

 

August 16th, 2018

Championing Quality Construction Information

We were pleased to see that research undertaken by @NHBC as part of their Construction Quality Reviews (CQR’s) is revealing that significant numbers of on site defects and abortive construction work could be prevented if the construction industry, in particular #housebuilders and #designandbuildcontractors, commissioned quality working drawings from their designers.

At Snug we are committed to producing appropriate working drawings that are fit for purpose and good value to our clients. This is not a one size fits all situation. Every project has its own requirements. A complex, contemporary and bespoke design being built by an in experienced contractor requires considerably more design information than a traditional design being built by an experienced house builder. Nonetheless, the drive to minimal expenditure and minimum information is a drive to the bottom.

We are advocating an industry standard for working drawings. This would allow clients and contractors to set appropriate standards of drawing and levels of detail so that tendering designers are clear on expectations. The current absence of any agreed standards or level of detail at tender stage means all architects have to price low. The result is a downwards pressure to prepare the least possible amount of information. This is in no ones interest.

We are asking organisations like the NHBC to help us prepare a universal set of standards for working drawings, covering minimum levels of production information that are properly coordinated and communicate critical details, quality standards and specification.

We believe the impact this could have on reducing costs to the construction industry could be huge. Clients benefit because tender returns are lower when the tender documentation is clear and risks reduced. Contractors benefit from a reduction in defective or abortive work. Architects benefit because their work is appropriately valued.

August 6th, 2018

Siliver Hill Antiques Market gets underway

We are delighted that civic chiefs have confirmed Winchester’s historic Antique Market will now become a hub for theatre, music and the arts, in the first redevelopment under the Silver Hill 2 scheme. Having been part of the team developing the wider masterplan we are pleased to have also been part of the first steps towards seeing the area rejuvenated.

Officially known as the Central Winchester Regeneration Project (CWR), the scheme aims to revamp the area surrounding the building, with the improvement of the Antique Market being one of Winchester City Council’s short-term goals.

The newly-formed ‘Nutshell Arts’ Community Interest Company plans to re-brand the venue as ‘The Nutshell’ and offer it as an accessible place for creatives to use for rehearsals, workshops, exhibitions and small-scale productions; alongside resident companies the Discarded Nut Theatre Company and ENCORE Youth Theatre. Richard Harrison of Snug Architects worked with them to develop design ideas and ensure the space within the venue can be fully accessible.

See http://www.hampshirechronicle.co.uk/news/16391694.first-of-silver-hill-2-revamps-as-deal-confirmed-at-antique-market/

and

http://www.winchester.gov.uk/news/2018/jul/former-antique-market-set-to-become-arts-venue-run-by-and-for-independent-creatives-and-the-local-community

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